Advertisement

Covering the Cover

Published:January 27, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2014.01.033
      Despite the operative resection of small primary pancreatic adenocarcinomas that are without any detectable metastases, the eventual development of metastases and subsequent mortality remains the norm. This has led to hypotheses that tumor dissemination may occur at a very early stage of pancreatic cancer. In fact, studies that employed genetically defined murine models of pancreatic cancer established that preneoplastic epithelial cells circulating in the blood could be isolated even before a primary tumor could be detected (Cell 2012;148:349–361). The authors proposed that such early, preneoplastic pancreatic cells circulating in the blood could represent a source for future metastatic disease.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      AGA Member Login
      Login with your AGA username and password.

      Purchase one-time access:

      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      Linked Article

      • Extensive Conversion of Hepatic Biliary Epithelial Cells to Hepatocytes After Near Total Loss of Hepatocytes in Zebrafish
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          Biliary epithelial cells (BECs) are considered to be a source of regenerating hepatocytes when hepatocyte proliferation is compromised. However, there is still controversy about the extent to which BECs can contribute to the regenerating hepatocyte population, and thereby to liver recovery. To investigate this issue, we established a zebrafish model of liver regeneration in which the extent of hepatocyte ablation can be controlled.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Detection of Circulating Pancreas Epithelial Cells in Patients With Pancreatic Cystic Lesions
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls).
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Regeneration of Liver After Extreme Hepatocyte Loss Occurs Mainly via Biliary Transdifferentiation in Zebrafish
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          The liver has high regenerative capacity, but it is not clear whether most biliary cells (particularly larger cholangiocytes) transdifferentiate into hepatocytes in regenerating liver. We investigated how this process might contribute to liver regeneration in zebrafish.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer Up to 10 Years After Screening, Surveillance, or Diagnostic Colonoscopy
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          Data from randomized controlled trials on the effects of screening colonoscopies on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality are not available. Observational studies have suggested that colonoscopies strongly reduce the risk of CRC, but there is little specific evidence on the effects of screening colonoscopies.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Hypoglycemia After Gastric Bypass: The Dark Side of GLP-1
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          Obesity is increasingly recognized as a major threat to individual and public health. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to achieve sustained weight loss with current medical approaches. Similarly, optimal treatment of obesity-related comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal for the majority of patients. Given these critical unmet needs, both clinicians and patients alike have been buoyed by the results of recent, controlled, clinical trials demonstrating potent effects of bariatric operative procedures to induce sustained weight loss and improve or normalize obesity-related comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Biliary Cells to the Rescue of Prometheus
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          From Greek mythology, we know that it was known as early as 8th century BC that the liver has an enormous regenerative capacity: Prometheus, punished by Zeus, was chained to a rock in the Caucasus, where an eagle was sent each day to feed on his liver that would grow back to be eaten again the next day. Thus, in contrast with many tissues, mature hepatocytes are capable of proliferating to replace damaged hepatocytes. However, when hepatocytes are no longer able to proliferate, “putative” progenitor cells can generate mature hepatocytes.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Blockade of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Receptor Corrects Postprandial Hypoglycemia After Gastric Bypass
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          Postprandial glycemia excursions increase after gastric bypass surgery; this effect is even greater among patients with recurrent hypoglycemia. These patients also have increased postprandial levels of insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). We performed a clinical trial to determine the role of GLP-1 in postprandial glycemia in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome after gastric bypass.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Lower Endoscopy Reduces Colorectal Cancer Incidence in Older Individuals
        GastroenterologyVol. 146Issue 3
        • Preview
          In older individuals, there are unclear effects of lower endoscopy on incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and of colonoscopy on site of CRC. We investigated whether sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy is associated with a decreased incidence of CRC in older individuals, and whether the effect of colonoscopy differs by anatomic location.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF